CLP REGULATIONS

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Classification and correct labelling of products containing hazardous chemicals is paramount to protecting users from potential physical, health or environmental hazards.

Free flow of products is facilitated by harmonisation of classification and labelling. In the EU, this is governed by the Regulation (EC) no. 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP).

What is CLP?

The CLP regulation is based on previous EU legislation that has been combined with the UN??s Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) and is to complement the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation. The CLP requires set labelling requirements which allow the identification and communication of hazards from chemicals.

The regulation aims to ensure appropriate labelling of products containing potentially hazardous chemicals. It requires all manufacturers, importers, formulators, distributors and retailers of substances or mixtures to classify, label and package their hazardous chemicals suitably in accordance with CLP before placing them on the market. Whether the product is classified as hazardous is decided by the supplier, termed ‘self-classification’, with some hazards harmonised at EU level which are listed in Annex VI. Classification criteria is set out in Annex I to the CLP regulation and identified hazards that fit the criteria will be assigned a hazard class.

How does the introduction of CLP affect substances, mixtures, packaging and labelling?

CLP was introduced over a number of years to allow suppliers time to change their products over to the new system. Classifying substances and mixtures has changed from allocation into 15 hazard classes to 28 hazard classes, these are further subdivided by severity, this means that some products may be placed in more or less severe categories under the new CLP regulation. In addition, there are a number of terminology changes (see table). CLP has changed the meaning of the symbols on product labelling and the additional details required on packaging including the appearance and meanings of pictograms.


Term used under the Dangerous Substances Directive and Dangerous Preparations Directive
(prior to 1st June 2017)
Term used in CLP
(post 1st June 2017)

Preparations

Mixtures

Dangerous

Hazardous

Symbols

Pictograms

Risk phrases

Hazard statements

Safety phrases

Precautionary statements

 

GHS PICTOGRAMS

SIGNAL WORD

H PHRASE

DESCRIPTION

GHS_symbols-07

DANGER

H224

Extremely flammable liquid and vapour

DANGER

H225

Highly flammable liquid and vapour

WARNING

H226

Flammable liquid and vapour

GHS_symbols-01

WARNING

H302

Harmful if swallowed

WARNING

H312

Harmful in contact with skin

WARNING

H332

Harmful if inhaled

WARNING

H315

Causes skin irritation

WARNING

H319

Causes serious eye irritation

WARNING

H317

May cause an allergic skin reaction

WARNING

H336

May cause drowsiness or dizziness

GHS_symbols-05

DANGER

H314

Causes severe skin burns and eye damage

DANGER

H318

Causes serious eye damage

 

GHS_symbols-04

WARNING

H351

Suspected of causing cancer

DANGER

H304

May be fatal if swallowed and enters airways

GHS_symbols-03

WARNING

H400

Very toxic to aquatic life

WARNING

H410

Very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects

(no signal word required)

H411

Toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects

(no signal word required)

H412

Harmful to aquatic life with long lasting effects

(no signal word required)

H413

May cause long lasting harmful effects to aquatic life

NO ADDED NATURAL RUBBER LATEX-02

(no signal word required)

N/A

No added Natural Rubber Latex

Why is CLP important?

CLP ensures consistent and comprehensive labelling and packaging of products containing chemicals with possible physical, health or environmental hazards. It is important to ensure safe handling of chemical substances and mixtures to protect users and the environment.

Products that fall under CLP regulations must follow a number of labelling rules:
• Labels must be firmly fixed to one or more surfaces of the product
• The label must be horizontally and easily readable when the package is set down normally
• Hazard pictograms must stand out easily from the background

The CLP regulation is not limited to industrial items containing potentially hazardous chemicals, it also applies to manufacturers of household items such as dishwashing tablets, drain cleaner and detergent. Pictograms common to products such as these include:

GHS_symbols-05

indicating the item is harmful and or corrosive and are accompanied by signal words, ‘DANGER’ or ‘WARNING’, dependent on the level of the hazard.

Items with ! could be harmful if they are inhaled, swallowed or come into contact with skin. This symbol is often seen on the packaging of dishwasher tablets.

The corrosive symbol is often seen on items such as drain cleaner and is associated with more serious health hazards. These products are often packaged with child resistant closures as they are publicly available from supermarkets and may be easily accessible in the home.

What does GAMA need to do to comply with the CLP regulation?

GAMA Healthcare Ltd., as a manufacturer of products containing chemicals with possible physical, health or environmental hazards, must conform with the criteria set out by CLP. The packaging and labelling of any products which fall under the CLP regulation must conform to the criteria. GAMA produce a number of products that fall under the CLP regulation and to comply, packaging and labelling must include the pictograms, signal words and set statements for hazard prevention and response, and safe storage and disposal for each type of hazardous substance or mixture.

How does CLP affect GAMA Healthcare Ltd.?

All manufacturers and importers of substances and mixtures must label and package substances in line with the CLP regulation. All products manufactured and imported by GAMA Healthcare conform to CLP regulations. Many of GAMA Healthcare??s products are not considered hazardous, however those that fall under the CLP regulation include Clinell Sporicidal Wipes and Spill Wipes, Alcohol wipes, and any products that contain chlorhexidine, including 2% chlorhexidine in 70% alcohol wipes. All products that fall under the CLP regulation are self-classified using harmonised classifications. Where required, the hazards and safety precautions appear on packaging of GAMA products. Full safety data sheets are available for any products that fall under the CLP regulation. MSDS sheets for all of Clinell’s products can be found online at http://clinell.com/products/.

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